Legends of Europe: Prosciutto Figs with Goat Cheese and Rosemary

My mission (should I choose to accept it):  To create an original recipe using Prosciutto di San Daniele from Legends from Europe. Legends from Europe is a 3 year campaign funded by the European Union and launched in the U.S. to increase awareness and celebrate “the legendary quality, tradition and taste” of five authentic PDO products (Protected Designation of Origin) from Europe: Prosciutto di Parma, Parmigiano Reffiano, Prosciutto di San Daniele, Grana Padano and Montasio.

As luck would have it, these 5 products happen to be some of my favorites. The biggest challenge I faced was not in accepting this mission but deciding which product to feature. Fortunately, the folks at Legends helped me with my choice and assigned me the Prosciutto di San Daniele.

Prosciutto di San Daniele is named for the region of San Daniele in northeastern Italy where it enjoys a unique micro-climate nestled between the Dolomite Alps and the Adriatic Sea. The ham is left to slow-cure naturally, following a 2,000 year-old tradition introduced by the Celts. Today, Prosciutto di San Daniele is considered a delicacy  with its mild flavor and delicate texture. This week, I will be posting a few recipes I’ve created with Legends’ Prosciutto di San Daniele.

Prosciutto Figs with Goat Cheese and Rosemary

A small rosemary sprig does double duty as a toothpick and aromatic, infusing the figs and goat cheese with its flavor as they bake in the oven. Makes 16 hors-d’oeuvres

8 ripe figs
2 ounces soft fresh goat cheese
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
8 slices “Legends from Europe” Prosciutto di San Daniele, halved lengthwise
16 3/4-inch rosemary sprigs with stem, plus 1/4 cup fresh rosemary leaves for garnish
Extra-virgin olive oil
Runny honey
Finely grated lemon zest for garnish

Heat oven to 375 F. Halve figs lengthwise. Place figs on a work surface, skin side down. Gently make a small indentation in each center with a teaspoon. Mix goat cheese and pepper together in a small bowl. Fill the indentation with goat cheese, about 1/2 teaspoon. Wrap a prosciutto slice, cross-wise, around fig. Spear a rosemary sprig through the center to hold the prosciutto in place. Repeat with remaining fig halves. Place figs in a baking dish. Lightly brush prosciutto with olive oil. Bake in oven until prosciutto begins to crisp, about 15 minutes. Remove from oven and transfer figs to a platter. Remove baked rosemary sprigs and discard (they will be brown). Replace with a few fresh rosemary leaves, without stem. Lightly drizzle figs with honey. Sprinkle with lemon zest. Serve warm.

16 responses to “Legends of Europe: Prosciutto Figs with Goat Cheese and Rosemary

  1. These look incredible, Lynda! Do you need any taste testers? My 6 year old has become a Prosciutto officianado.

  2. A tasty combination! Those parcels look really tempting.

    Cheers,

    Rosa

  3. Oh, how exciting! I would have had a hard time choosing too – great twist on the classic with the goat’s cheese. It’s my fave too!

  4. I need a goat and a fig tree.. sigh.. c

  5. These look really good! I think I am going to keep this for our plantation Wine and Cheese Reception! Thank you!

  6. I have nominated you for the Inspirational blogger award :) See this link for details http://chezsasha.com/2012/09/21/inspirational-blogger-award/

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  8. Pingback: prosciutto figs with goat cheese and rosemary. | Cooking Pics

  9. Oh…what I wouldn’t give for one of those bites right NOW!

  10. Beautiful presentation! I love the use of rosemary…I find it hard to make figs and prosciutto (dates too) not look too, well, blah… but you really nailed it! Delicious and Decadent!

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  12. these we absolutely amazing! we took them to a lunch get together with friends, and were feeling a bit guilty because we knew two of our friends didn’t like figs… but EVERYONE adored these. great recipe – thanks!

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