Tag Archives: roast

Roasted Chicken and Potatoes with Yogurt, Lemon and Garlic

If you are wishing for an easy and rewarding rustic dinner then look no further than this roast chicken. A whole roasted chicken is  a weeknight wonder, yielding a bounty of food with little effort. It will fill your home with comforting and tantalizing aromas as it cooks, amply feed a family of 4 with leftovers for lunch, and bestow you with the goods for a rich and restorative stock.

I roast a chicken nearly weekly in our home. For variety, it’s easy to change it up with a rub or marinade depending on the mood or season. Feeling spicy? Then try a marinade with Sriracha and serve over a bed of couscous. Prefer something cozy and traditional for a grey and rainy day? Then keep it simple with olive oil, rosemary, thyme and a pan gravy. If you are in the mood for exotic spice and aroma, like I was the other day, then try this recipe which infuses the bird with yogurt, lemon, garlic and ginger.

Roasted Chicken and Potatoes with Yogurt, Lemon and Garlic 

Serve with baby potatoes roasted in the pan juices. Serves 4 to 6.

For the chicken:
1 whole free-range or organic chicken, 4 to 5 pounds
3 garlic cloves, minced
1/4 cup whole milk Greek-style yogurt
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon grated peeled fresh ginger
1 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest
2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom

For the potatoes:
2 pounds baby potatoes, halved if large
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 teaspoon paprika
1 teaspoon salt

Thirty minutes before roasting, remove the chicken from the refrigerator. Preheat oven to 425 F. Rinse the chicken all over and inside the cavity with cold water. Pat dry with paper towels. Combine the remaining ingredients in a small bowl and whisk to blend. Rub the paste all over the outside of the chicken, between the skin and breast, and inside the cavity.  Place, breast-side up, in the center of a baking pan or oven proof skillet.

Prepare the potatoes: Toss the potatoes, olive oil, paprika and salt in a bowl. Scatter around the chicken. Place the pan in the oven. Bake for 30 minutes. Remove from oven. Using tongs, carefully turn the chicken over, breast-side down. Stir the potatoes. Return to oven and bake for 20 minutes. Remove and once again turn the chicken over, breast-side up. Return to oven and cook until chicken is thoroughly cooked and thigh juices run clear when pierced with a knife, about 20 minutes. Remove from oven. Transfer chicken to a cutting board. Tent with foil and let rest 10 to 15 minutes before carving. While the chicken is resting, return potatoes to oven to keep warm. Carve the chicken and return to skillet, nestling the meat between the potatoes in the pan juices.

Roasted Chicken and Vegetables with Mustard and Tarragon

There is something intrinsically satisfying about roasting a chicken. Versatile, economical, forgiving, and consistently delicious: a roast is perfect family dinner fare, and also worthy of casual entertaining. Expecting guests? Roast 2 chickens and double up on the ingredients. Variations abound.  In our case, roast chicken often involves a rub, as minimal as simply salt or more embellished with olive oil, garlic, lemon, mustard. Add an Asian twist with grated ginger, or head to north Africa with coriander and cumin. A favorite preparation is to roast the bird nestled in a pan with seasonal vegetables. As the chicken cooks, the vegetables brown and baste, adding to the flavor to the pan juices.

Roast Chicken and Spring Vegetables with Mustard and Tarragon
Serves 4-6

This recipe takes advantage of spring’s new vegetables. Feel free to mix and match with what’s available. I used thick purple spring onions, white carrots and baby turnips. Onions, fennel and potatoes are also a sure thing. For a rustic family-style presentation, return the carved chicken to the skillet in which it roasted, amidst the vegetables and pan juices.

1  3-4 pound whole chicken
Salt
Juice of one lemon
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/4 cup fresh tarragon sprigs, coarsely chopped, plus extra for garnish

1 pound (6-8)  baby turnips, ends trimmed, halved
1/2 pound baby carrots, ends trimmed
6-8 thick red spring onions, ends trimmed, halved crosswise

Preheat oven to 400 F. Rinse and pat dry the chicken outside and inside the cavity. Whisk lemon juice, olive oil, mustard, 1 teaspoon salt and pepper together in a small bowl. Stir in the tarragon. Rub the 3/4 of the marinade all over the chicken – inside the cavity, outside, and between the skin and breast meat.
Place turnips, carrots and onions in a bowl. Toss with remaining marinade. Dump the vegetables into a large cast iron skillet or roasting pan. Nestle the chicken, breast-side up, in the middle of the vegetables. Roast in the oven for 30 minutes. Remove; using tongs turn chicken over, breast-side down. Return to oven and roast 20 minutes. Remove; turn chicken one more time. Continue roasting until chicken is cooked through and juices run clear when a knife is inserted in the thigh, 20-30 minutes. Transfer chicken to a cutting board and tent with foil. Let rest 15 minutes. Carve the chicken and return to the skillet with the vegetables and juices. Serve.

Wined and Brined Pork Rib Roast

Round 3 Charcutepalooza challenge: The Brine – and a Pork Rib Roast

I love brines. Give me an extra 24 hours, a box of sea salt and some spices, and I will happily submerge poultry and meat in a liquid bath. A long soak adds moisture to the protein while it brines for hours or even days, ensuring succulent results. This  month’s Charcutepalooza challenge dictated a brine, and I chose pork for several reasons. Lean pork meat can easily dry out, so it is a perfect candidate for moisture inducing brines. I also confess that I like pork best when it’s fortified and embellished with strong umami flavors and marinades, smoothing out the pork’s, er, porky flavor.

To this brine I added white wine, inspired by a pleasant memory of an exquisite roasted pork saddle we enjoyed at Incanto Restaurant in San Francisco. While a recipe was never divulged, Chef Chris Cosentino shared with us that he marinated the pork in wine for several days. And he knows his pork – which rocks. So, inspired by this memory and Charcutapalooza, I made this pork rib roast.

Wined and Brined Pork Rib Roast

If possible, let the pork brine for several days. I brined this roast for 4 days, and the results were flavorful, juicy and tender. Serves 8.

For the brine:
4 quarts water, divided
1 – 750 ml. bottle dry white wine
1 cup light brown sugar
3/4 cup coarse sea salt or kosher salt
8 sage leaves
4 rosemary sprigs
4 bay leaves
1 teaspoon juniper berries
1 teaspoon black peppercorns

1 pork rib roast, with 8 bones

For the roast:
2 garlic cloves
2 tablespoons fresh rosemary
1 tablespoon black peppercorns
4 sage leaves
2 tablespoons Dijon-style mustard
1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 tablespoon olive oil

Combine 1 quart water and remaining brine ingredients (not the pork) in a pot large enough to hold the roast. Bring to a boil and cook, stirring until the salt and sugar dissolve. Remove from heat, stir in remaining 3 quarts of water and cool completely. Add pork. If pork is not entirely submerged, add additional water to cover. Cover pot and refrigerate at least 24 hours and up to 4 days.

Roast the pork:
3 hours before roasting, remove the pork from the brine and rinse under cold water. Pat dry with paper towels and refrigerate, uncovered.
Remove from refrigerator 1 hour before roasting. Smash garlic, rosemary, peppercorns and sage leaves in a mortar with pestle. Whisk in mustard, lemon juice and olive oil. Smear the paste all over the pork. Place on a rack in a baking pan. Roast in a preheated 400 F. oven until an instant-read thermometer registers 140 F. Let the pork roast rest 20 minutes before carving. Serve garnished with sage leaves and lemon wedges.

What is Charcutepalooza?
An inspirational idea hatched by Cathy Barrow and Kim Foster and now partnering with Food52. It celebrates a Year in Meat, where participating foodies and bloggers will cure, smoke and salt their way through Michael Ruhlman’s bestselling cookbook Charcuterie.

Roasted Chicken with Cardamom and Yogurt


Roasted Chicken with Cardamom and Yogurt

Did you know that cardamom is referred to as the Queen of Spices? It makes sense, then, that this regal spice will behave like proper royalty, restrained yet in charge, when teamed with a slick of spices in a potent paste for roast chicken. As the chicken marinates for some hours, the heady aromas of garlic and ginger will waft about and you may think that cardamom’s perfume is all but lost. Don’t be fooled. These bold flavors are all swagger, and will be suitably tamed and smoothed with roasting. As their sharpness mellows, the elegant cardamom will gracefully step forward, shining through in the finished flavor of the meat and crispy skin.

Roasted Chicken with Cardamom and Yogurt

Butterflying the chicken ensures quick and even roasting. The yoghurt will tenderize the meat and contribute to the browning of the skin.  Serves 4-6.

6 cardamom pods, seeds removed
1 teaspoon black peppercorns
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon ground coriander
1 teaspoon sea salt
3 garlic cloves
1 tablespoon olive oil
1/2 cup whole milk greek style yogurt
1 tablespoon ground fresh ginger
1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice

1 3-4 pound chicken, butterflied

Grind cardamom seeds and peppercorns in a mortar with pestle to a powder. Add cumin, coriander, salt and garlic and smash together. Add olive oil to form a paste. Stir in yogurt, ginger and lemon juice.  Smear spices between skin and breast and all over the chicken, front and back. Refrigerate at least 2 hours and up to 24 hours. 3o minutes before roasting, remove chicken from refrigerator.
Preheat oven to 425 F. (210 C.) Place chicken breast-side up in a baking pan or cast iron pan. Bake in oven until thoroughly cooked, 45  minutes – 1 hour. Remove from oven and let rest 15 minutes. Carve and serve.

Roasted Lemon Cilantro Chicken


Cilantro Lemon Chicken

The grill is on. Every day. And at least once a week this involves a whole chicken for a family dinner. In the winter we do it in the oven, and in the summer we do it on the grill. Both methods are similar, while grilling adds a smokier flavor to the chicken meat, especially when using a charcoal grill. Cilantro is also a family favorite, and the marinade for the chicken is chock-a-block full of it. For those who are faint of heart when it comes to cilantro, you can substitute rosemary or thyme with great results (be sure to omit the saffron from the paste). 

Roasted Lemon Cilantro Chicken
Serves 4-5

2 large garlic cloves
1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro sprigs
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
3 teaspoons sea salt, divided
1 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest
1/4 teaspoon saffron threads
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 whole 3-4 pound chicken
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Make the paste:
Combine garlic, cilantro, lemon juice, 2 teaspoons salt, lemon zest and saffron in a mortar with pestle or bowl of a food processor.  Smash or grind to a paste.  Stir or pulse in 2 tablespoons olive oil.  Rub chicken between skin and breast meat and inside cavity with the paste. Rub the outside of the skin with one tablespoon olive oil. Sprinkle with 1 teaspoon salt and black pepper. Place on tray or platter, breast-side up and cover loosely with plastic wrap. Refrigerate at least 2 hours and up to 6 hours.  Remove from refrigerator 30 minutes before roasting.

Prepare Chicken:
Prepare grill for indirect medium heat or preheat oven to 450 F. (225 C.)
 Place chicken, breast-side up on the grill with a pan below to catch it’s juices. (If roasting in the oven, place chicken in a roasting pan). Close the lid of the grill and roast for 20 minutes. Carefully turn chicken over with tongs. Roast, covered, another 20 minutes. Turn chicken over once more, breast-side up. Continue roasting, covered, 20 minutes. Check to see if chicken is done by carefully cutting skin between breast and thigh. If meat is pink, continue roasting additional 10 – 15 minutes. Chicken is cooked when meat is no longer pink, and clear juices run from the thigh when pierced with a knife. Remove from heat, cover loosely with foil and let rest 15 minutes before carving.

Smoked Ham with Pomegranate Molasses, Black Pepper and Mustard Glaze


Ham

If you are looking for a twist on the traditional Easter ham, look no further. This ham is smoked and coated with a Pomegranate Molasses, Black Peppercorn and Mustard Glaze. Unlike the super-sweet glazes frequently used for baked hams, the pomegranate molasses adds a distinct sweet-tart flavor to the glaze without overpowering the meat. Pomegranate Molasses is a thick syrup made from reduced pomegranate juice.  A key ingredient found in Middle Eastern cuisine, its flavor is a unique contrast between sweet and sour, which makes it a great addition to marinades, dressings and glazes. In this recipe, the deep red color of the molasses imparts a rich mahogany hue to the crust of the meat, while it’s sweet and sour flavor coaxes out the smokiness of the ham.  Dijon mustard lends extra sharpness and depth to the flavors while freshly ground black peppercorns give a nice kick.

Smoked Ham with Pomegranate Molasses, Black Peppercorn and Mustard Glaze

This recipe may be doubled. Serve the meat with Dijon mustard, cornichons and extra glaze as condiments for a nice rustic presentation. Pomegranate molasses can be found in Middle Eastern shops or the international specialty aisles in your supermarket. Serves 6.

1/2 bone-in smoked ham, 5-6 lbs.
3/4 cups pomegranate molasses
1/4 cup Dijon mustard, plus extra for serving
2 tablespoons whiskey
1 tablespoon ground whole black peppercorns
1 teaspoon ground allspice
1 teaspoon kosher salt
Cornichons

Let the ham come to room temperature 1 hour before cooking. Preheat oven to 325 F.

Make the glaze: Combine pomegranate molasses, 1/4 cup mustard, whiskey, pepper, allspice and salt in a bowl and mix to blend well.

Prepare ham: Place ham, fat side up, in a foil lined roasting pan. Score fat in a cross-hatch pattern at 1-2″ intervals without incising the meat.
Generously baste the ham with the glaze. Bake in oven, basting occasionally, until internal temperature of the ham is 120 F. (about 10 minutes per pound.) The ham should be deep golden brown and crusty at this time. If not, increase heat to 450 F. and continue to bake for a few minutes, while keeping an eye on the ham so it doesn’t burn. Remove from oven and transfer to cutting board. Let rest 20 minutes before carving. To serve, transfer remaining basting sauce to a small saucepan and simmer briefly, brushing down the sides, to heat through and burn off alcohol.Slice ham and serve with Dijon mustard, cornichons and basting sauce as condiments on the side.