Tag Archives: chutney

Cranberry Fig Chutney

~ Cranberry, Fig & Rosemary Chutney ~

Thanksgiving dinner is simply not complete without a cranberry sauce. While I have nothing against the traditional cranberry-sugar combination, I often find missing an extra layer or kick of flavor – so I devised this chutney. Chutneys are concoctions of sweet and savory fruit, spices and herbs, resulting in a well-rounded mouthful that pops in your mouth. This recipe is not heavily weighed down by too many spices, so the humble cranberry shines through – which, of course, is a requisite for Thanksgiving.

Cranberry Fig Chutney

This chutney is not just for the Thanksgiving table. Use it as a condiment for roasted pork, duck and chicken. It’s also delicious when served as a condiment on a cheese board, or dabbed on crostini with soft goat cheese. Makes about 2 cups.

18 dried black mission figs, quartered
1/2 cup Port wine
12 ounces cranberries, fresh or frozen
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1 tablespoon finely grated ginger (I use a microplane)
Juice and zest from 1/2 orange
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 (2-inch) rosemary sprig

Place the figs in a small bowl. Pour the Port wine over the figs. Set aside for 30 minutes. When the figs are ready, place the cranberries and sugar in a heavy medium saucepan. Heat over medium heat until sugar dissolves. Add figs and Port wine, ginger, orange juice and zest, salt, pepper and rosemary sprig. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to medium-low. Simmer, uncovered, until cranberries burst and chutney has thickened, stirring occasionally, about 20 minutes. Remove from heat and cool completely. Discard rosemary sprig. (May be made up to 2 days in advance. Cover and refrigerate. Serve at room temperature).

Here are a few more recipes for the Thanksgiving table from TasteFood:

Brussel Sprout Gratin
Sweet Potato Mash
Pumpkin Pecan Roulade
Cranberry Walnut Trifle

Pork Rillettes with Calvados and a recipe for Apple Prune Chutney

 Charcutepalooza Challenge #10: Stretching
Pork Rillettes with Calvados 

These little pots of meaty goodness promise to make right in the world. Rillettes are potted jars and terrines of meat confit, slow cooked in fat, shredded and packed in more fat. Rustic, unctuous and oh-so-rich, a little dab goes a long way. Which is why the process of making rillettes is called “stretching,” which is this month’s Charcutepalooza challenge.

Stretching is an economical and sparing way of making meat last – using all of the last bits and preserving them for later use. It’s a method steeped in conservation and frugality, yet its results are rich and luxurious. It’s the paradox of French country cooking, and it’s why I love it.

Duck, goose and pork are traditional proteins for rillettes. I chose pork and adapted a recipe from WrightFood where the pork is spiced and marinated overnight in Calvados, then slowly cooked in duck fat. Need I say more?

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I like to accompany rillettes with fruit chutney. The sweet piquancy of chutney adds a fresh balance to the rich meat. Chutneys are flexible and forgiving. Use a mix of fresh and dried fruit, combined with an acid, such as vinegar or citrus. Sweet and savory with a kick, chutneys are perfect accompaniments to meat and poultry.

Apple Prune Chutney
Makes about 2 cups

1 tablespoon olive oil
2 large Granny Smith apples, peeled, cored, cut in 1/4 inch dice
1 large shallot, chopped, about 1/4 cup
1/2 cup coarsely chopped pitted prunes
1/3 cup currants or raisins
1/2 cup apple cider vinegar
1/3 cup Armagnac
2 tablespoons brown sugar
1 teaspoon ground coriander
1/2 teaspoon finely ground juniper berries
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Heat oil in a saucepan over medium heat. Add apples and shallot. Sauté until beginning to soften without browning, 2 minutes. Add remaining ingredients. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low and simmer uncovered until liquid has nearly evaporated, about 15 minutes. Remove from heat and cool to room temperature. Cover and refrigerate until use. May be made up to 2 days in advance. (Flavors will develop with time.)

What is Charcutepalooza?
An inspirational idea hatched by Cathy Barrow and Kim Foster and partnering with Food52 and Punk Domestics. It celebrates a Year in Meat, where participating foodies and bloggers will cure, smoke and salt their way through Michael Ruhlman‘s bestselling cookbook Charcuterie.

Tequila-Spiked Cranberry, Apple and Jalapeño Relish

This is not your ordinary cranberry sauce. Spiked with tequila and boosted with jalapeño, this relish is bright and spicy, promising a nice kick at the holiday table. Be sure to keep the recipe on hand, post-festivities. Tequila-Spiked Cranberry, Apple and Jalapeño Relish is also a fresh and zesty accompaniment to roast pork and chicken.

Tequila-Spiked Cranberry, Apple and Jalapeño Relish
Makes 2 cups

12 ounces fresh cranberries, washed and picked over
3/4 cup light brown sugar
1/4 cup freshly squeezed orange juice
1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
1 teaspoon mustard seeds
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1 Granny Smith apple, cored, peeled, cut in 1/4″ dice
1 jalapeño pepper, stemmed, seeded, finely diced
2 tablespoons tequila
1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lime juice
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Combine cranberries, sugar, orange juice, vinegar and mustard seeds in a medium saucepan.  Bring to a boil, then simmer, occasionally stirring, until cranberries pop and sauce thickens, about 15 minutes.  Stir in remaining ingredients and simmer one minute.  Remove from heat and cool.  Refrigerate, covered,  at least 2 hours or overnight to let flavors develop.