Tag Archives: tartine

Ricotta Beet Bruschette with Garden Pesto

beet pesto plate tastefood
There’s something very pleasing about an open-faced sandwich a.k.a. bruschetta in Italy, tartine in France, or smørrebrød in Scandinavia. The filling becomes the topping, which is a lovely reflection of the sum of its parts and a visual tease, beckoning a bite. It begins with day old bread which gets a revitalizing browning on the grill. From there you can get as creative as you like. This rendition includes fresh ricotta, roasted beets and a generous smear of a garden pesto I made with parsley and mint.

Ricotta Beet Bruschette with Garden Pesto
Makes 6.

Garden Pesto:
2 cups fresh parsley
1 cup fresh mint
1 small garlic clove
1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil, plus extra as needed
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

6 slices day-old ciabatta or country loaf bread, about 3/4-inch thick each
Extra-virgin olive oil
Fresh ricotta cheese
6 roasted and peeled baby beets, cut into wedges
Sea salt
Freshly ground black pepper
Fresh baby oregano and thyme flowers

Make the pesto:
Place the parsley, mint, and garlic in the bowl of a food processor. Process until finely chopped. With the motor running add the 1/2 cup oil in a steady stream until blended. If too thick, add extra oil to your desired consistency. Season with salt and pepper.

Heat the oven broiler or a grill. Brush the bread slices with oil. Broil or grill until toasted golden on both sides but still tender in the center. Remove and cool the bread for 5 minutes. Smear the ricotta on the bread, then drizzle some of the pesto over the ricotta. Top with beets. Brush the beets with a little oil and season the bruschetta with salt and pepper. Garnish with fresh oregano and thyme flowers. Serve whole or cut in half for smaller bites.

Warm Smoked Salmon Salad Tartines

~ Warm Smoked Salmon, Kale, Lemon, Capers, Parsley ~

I was gifted some loot this weekend. Loot, for me, often comes in the edible form, and this gift – a 2 pound package of warm smoked Alaskan salmon – didn’t disappoint. It managed to sit in my refrigerator for all of 18 hours before I couldn’t stand it anymore and ripped the plastic wrapping open for a taste. And another. Before things got too out of hand, I decided to whip up a recipe to use the rest of the salmon before I devoured the whole slab of fish. Naturally, I needed to taste the recipe as I tweaked it, so a small, er, nicely sized bowl managed to remain untouched until dinner when we made these as an appetizer.

Smoked Salmon Salad Tartines

Depending on your mood (or where you might like to be) these can be called tartines, bruschette or open-face sandwiches. For a lighter version, omit the bread and serve the salmon salad simply on the kale leaves. Warm smoked salmon is available in fish markets and specialty stores. To learn more about how it’s prepared, read here.
Makes 10.

10 ounces warm smoked salmon, flaked
1/4 cup finely chopped red onion
1/4 cup chopped Italian parsley leaves
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 tablespoon Greek yogurt or sour cream
2 teaspoons capers, chopped
1 to 2 teaspoons Sriracha or hot sauce, to taste
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
10 slices baguette, cut 1/2-inch thick, or 5 slices peasant/levain bread, cut in half
Extra-virgin olive oil
Sea salt
10 Tuscan kale leaves (or baby gem lettuce leaves)
1/2 lemon

Combine the salmon, onion, parsley, lemon juice, yogurt, capers, Sriracha and pepper in a bowl. Mix with a fork to thoroughly combine. Brush the bread with olive oil and lightly sprinkle with sea salt. Toast in oven until light golden on both sides. Remove and cool slightly. Tear 2-inch tips off of the kale leaves. (Save the rest of the kale for another use). Place a leaf tip on bread. Brush with olive oil. Spoon salmon salad over the kale. Squeeze with half lemon.

If you like this, you might enjoy these recipes:
Tuna Melt from Bona Fide Farm Food
Roasted Tomato Tartine from the Kitchn
Bruschetta with Chanterelles and Brie from Herbivoracious
Avocado Bruschetta with Balsamic Syrup from TasteFood
Peach and Blue Cheese Bruschetta with Honey and Thyme from TasteFood
Roasted Salmon with Green Olive and Almond Tapenade from TasteFood

Homemade Duck Prosciutto and a Tartine

For those of you not in the know, there is a fabulous food blog event taking place as we speak. I refer to Charcutepalooza: A Year in Meat, hosted by Cathy Barrow and Kim Foster. These two bloggers have come up with the inspirational idea to cure, smoke and salt their way through Michael Ruhlman’s bestselling cookbook Charcuterie along with the participating food blogging community. I am a huge fan of charcuterie as well as the precepts of using sustainable and humanely raised meat, so it was without hesitation that I joined in the Charcutepalooza party.

The first challenge of the year was to make homemade duck prosciutto. I have long wished to make my own prosciutto, and what better way to get my feet wet (or hands salty) than with duck breasts. The only difficult aspect of the preparation was waiting 7 days for them to cure. During this time I learned two valuable things: Duck prosciutto is extremely easy to make, and that patience is a virtue – at least when it comes to curing meat.

There are many ways to enjoy duck prosciutto, the simplest quite often the best. In this case I prepared a tartine, or a French open-face sandwich. The prosciutto is paired with melting reblochon cheese and layered over mixed greens. At once rustic and fresh, this recipe is a great way to kick off Charcutepalooza’s Year of Meat.

Duck Prosciutto and Reblochon Tartine

Reblochon is a soft cow milk cheese from the Savoie region of the French alps. It may be substituted with Saint Nectaire or Camembert. Try using a variety of greens and herbs. I used what I had on hand: flat leaf parsley, mizuna and radicchio.

Makes 4

2 slices of french country bread, sliced 1/2 inch thick, halved
Extra-virgin olive oil
2 cups mixed greens, such as lambs lettuce, frisée, green herbs
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
4 wedges Reblochon or Saint Nectaire cheese
4 sprigs rosemary
4 slices duck prosciutto

Preheat oven broiler. Lightly brush bread with olive oil. Arrange on baking tray and broil, turning once, until lightly golden. Remove from oven, but don’t turn off the heat.
Place greens in a bowl. Drizzle with 1 tablespoon olive oil. Sprinkle with a pinch of salt and pepper; toss.
Place wedges of cheese in a small baking pan. Top each wedge with a rosemary sprig. Broil until cheese begins to soften and bubble, 1-2 minutes. Remove from oven.
Arrange bread slices on a plate or platter. Top with greens. Place a cheese wedge on the greens. Lay a slice of prosciutto over the greens and cheese. Sprinkle with pepper and drizzle with a few drops of olive oil. Serve immediately.