Tag Archives: dip

Beet Hummus

beet-hummus

You may have seen beet hummus before – that dip that transcends all dips, the upstager on the party table, flamboyantly fuscia in color, with FIESTA written all over it. Yep, that would be the beet hummus. Sure, the name is rather frumpy, but it makes up for any nomenclatural dowdiness with its captivating vibrance and subtle sweetness tinged with citrus and spice. In this recipe, I match the powerful visuals with bold flavors, and spike the hummus with Sriracha and lime, which stand up well to the earthy backdrop of the beets and round out the flavors.

beet-hummus-tastefood

Beet Hummus

This dip is a looker, it tastes great, and it’s healthy, too. Serve it with a kaleidoscope of cruditees for dipping, such as carrots, watermelon radishes, and cucumber wedges. Eating your daily dose of veggies never tasted this good.

Makes about 2 cups

2 to 3 medium red beets, about 12 ounces, roasted until tender, skin removed
1 (15-ounce) can chickpeas, drained and rinsed
2 garlic cloves
1/4 cup fresh lime juice (or half lemon/half lime)
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1/4 cup tahini
2 teaspoons Sriracha
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1. Place all of the ingredients in the bowl of a food processor and process to blend. Add more oil to your desired consistency (it should not be soupy) and taste for seasoning.
2. Transfer to a bowl and garnish with finely grated lemon zest, chopped mint, and a drizzle of olive oil. Serve with pita and cruditees.

Havarti Cheese Fonduta

Castello Fonduta TasteFood

Roasted Potatoes and Broccolini with Havarti Cheese Fonduta

No, this is not about fondue…or not quite. Fonduta, is an Italian specialty hailing from the Piedmont and Valle d’Aosta regions. Like its French and Swiss alpine cousins, fonduta consists of melted cheese. Where it differs is in its preparation. While fondue is made in a pot with wine and simmered table-side over a flame, requiring constant stirring to prevent curdling, fonduta is a melty blend of cheese, milk, and often egg yolk, with a creamy yet stable consistency, allowing for more versatility, such as dipping or pouring.

Fonduta CruditeVegetable Cruditées with Havarti Cheese Fonduta

This recipe is an easy variation of fonduta, which takes advantage of the robust flavors of havarti cheese. The egg is omitted and the milk is partly replaced with cream, creating a rich canvas to allow the cheese to shine through. Served warm on a plate with roasted vegetables, it provides a comforting “soup” or drizzle. Served warm in a cup, it’s a lovely complement to crisp fresh cruditées.

Havarti Cheese Fonduta
Makes about 1/2 cup

4 ounces melting cheese, such as Havarti, coarsely grated
1 teaspoon cornstarch
1/4 cup heavy cream
1/4 cup whole milk
Pinch of freshly ground black pepper

In a bowl, toss the cheese and cornstarch to coat. Heat the cream and milk in a small saucepan until it just comes to a boil. Reduce the heat to low. Add the cheese in 2 batches, stirring constantly to melt the cheese before adding the next batch. Stir until smooth, then remove from the heat. Season with black pepper. Serve immediately as a bed for hearty roasted vegetables or with cruditées for dipping.

Roasted Carrot, Chickpea and Harissa Hummus

carrot hummus tastefoodHealthy Party Appetizer: Roasted Carrot, Chickpea and Harissa Hummus

I have had my sights on making a carrot hummus for a while. My friend Steve over at Oui Chef got me thinking about a spicy variation of the chickpea hummus when he posted a tantalizing recipe on his blog inspired by theKitchn. Now that the holidays are *almost* behind us, I find myself with some welcome free time to dabble in the kitchen – plus I have to bring an appetizer to a party tonight, so I decided to make a rendition of carrot hummus. A carrot hummus, you say? Picture you’re favorite Middle Eastern hummus, a blend of chickpeas, tahini, garlic and lemon. Then send it further west to North Africa, picking up a few ingredients along the way: carrots, coriander, mint, and the oh-so special harissa, a fiery red chile paste. The result is a vibrant and zesty hummus, with a kick of heat and a gentle perfume of spice. A shower of chopped pistachios and chopped mint finish this dip, ensuring freshness and satisfying crunch while topping this healthy party dip with a festive crown.

Roasted Carrot, Chickpea, and Harissa Hummus

Makes about 2 cups
Active Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 40 minutes

Carrots:
1/2 pound carrots, peeled, cut into 1-inch pieces
1 tablespoon olive oil
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon cumin
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Hummus:
1 (15-ounce) can chick peas, drained and rinsed
2 garlic cloves, chopped
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
2 tablespoons tahini
1 to 2 tablespoons harissa
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, plus extra for garnish

Garnish:
1/4 cup coarsely chopped shelled pistachios
1/4 cup fresh mint leaves, chopped

1. Heat the oven to 400°F. Place the carrots in a small baking dish. Add the oil, salt, cumin, and black pepper and stir to coat. Roast in the oven until the carrots are tender, 25 to 30 minutes, stirring once or twice. Remove and cool slightly.

2. Transfer the carrots and any pan juices to the bowl of a food processor. Add the remaining dip ingredients and process until smooth. If too thick, add additional olive oil or warm water to your desired consistency. Taste for seasoning.

3. Transfer the hummus to a serving bowl and garnish with the pistachios, mint, and extra black pepper. Serve with pita wedges, baguette, and/or cruditées.

1. Heat the oven to 400°F. Place the carrots in a small baking dish. Add the oil, salt, cumin, and black pepper and stir to coat. Roast in the oven until the carrots are tender, 25 to 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove and cool slightly.
2. Transfer the carrots and any pan juices to the bowl of a food processor. Add the remaining dip ingredients and process until smooth. If too thick, add additional olive oil or warm water. Taste for seasoning.
3. Serve in a bowl, garnished with the pistachios, mint, and extra black pepper

Apples and Tsatsiki

Green Apples 2
September is the gateway to autumn, my favorite season. Everything seems to sparkle in the lower light, perhaps as a last hurrah while the foliage changes its color, leaves begin to fall and nature hunkers down for the winter. Warm, cosy pullovers are pulled from storage; enough time cannot be spent outdoors walking in the woods, raking leaves, picking apples and breathing in the crisp fall air tinged with smells of chimney smoke and fallen wet leaves.  At home, the fire is lit, homemade bread bakes, and the wooden floor creaks beneath my feet while I pad around the kitchen preparing a comforting braised dish for our dinner.

But wait.  I live in California now.  It’s actually hot outside.  I have summer dresses in my closet – not fluffy cardigans. The redwoods don’t lose their leaves. My kitchen floor is tiled, not wooden.  And grilling is the only sane way to cook in this heat.

Where is that New England autumn I grew up with?  Since I moved from Boston many years ago, all ensuing autumns, whether in Europe or here, have been measured, perhaps unfairly, against New England’s version. Even in the less temperate climates of Switzerland, England and Denmark the smells and colors failed to capture the autumnal intensity I remember from my youth, an intensity especially associated with the return to school after summer holidays. Presently, in my new home of Northern California, the children have returned to school, but autumn is nowhere to be found.  In fact, there is talk of an Indian summer happening at this moment.  How can there be Indian summer, when summer hasn’t even ended?  This is just more summer, and hotter.  Please don’t misunderstand me. This is not a complaint, just an observation – with a trace of wistfulness. Apparently, you can take the girl out of New England, but you cannot take New England out of the girl.

So, having said all of that, I shall do what I always try to do:  I will get on with it, embracing the moment and the environment – in flip-flops, tank-top and shorts.  The following recipe will not be for an apple tart or a stew.  Rather, it will be a simple staple that I cannot live without on a warm day; a wonderful accompaniment to grilled meats and vegetables – especially late, end of summer vegetables. It is also a cool, creamy dip or salad on the side, best served with bread.  The other autumn recipes will follow later on, when I can finally put on the cardigan, and after I have been out apple-picking, my eyes and nose watering from the brisk fesh air.

Tsatsiki

Makes about 3 cups

14 oz. (400 grams) Greek-style whole milk yogurt
1 English cucumber, washed, seeded, diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tablespoon, plus 1 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon salt, or to taste
Freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup fresh mint leaves, chopped

In a bowl, combine yogurt, cucumber, garlic, 1 tablespoon olive oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper.  Stir in mint leaves.  Adjust seasoning to taste.  Transfer to a serving bowl. (Tsatsiki can be refrigerated covered up to 4 hours before serving.)
Before serving, drizzle with 1 teaspoon olive oil.  Garnish with mint leaves.  Serve with peasant bread or baguette.