Tag Archives: crostini

Tomato Bruschetta

tomato bruschetta tastefood

Posted by Lynda Balslev

When I make tomato bruschetta, my family always says, “Summer food!” And so it is - especially when it’s made on the grill. Everything happens on our grill year round, I mean, during the summer. For this recipe slices of baguette get all toasty and charred on the Weber. Believe me, it’s worth the step for the flavor and saves you from the heat of the oven broiler. The grilled bread is then smothered with fresh chopped tomatoes infused with fresh basil from the garden, garlic and a glugg of olive oil. So simple, so good. If you could have summer in a mouthful, this would be it.

Tomato Bruschetta

I like the rustic presentation of halved baguette sections. Alternatively, slice the baguette on the diagonal 1/2-inch thick. Serves 4 to 6.

1 1/2 pounds vine ripened tomatoes
3 garlic cloves
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 cup basil leaves, torn in small pieces
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 baguette

Cut each tomato in half, and scoop out the juices and seeds with your fingers or a small spoon. Cut the tomatoes into 1/4-inch dice and place in a bowl. Add 1 minced garlic clove, the olive oil, basil, 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1/2 teaspoon black pepper. Gently stir to combine and taste for seasoning. If you don’t have super sweet tomatoes yet, a pinch of sugar may be added.

Cut the baguette crosswise into 3-inch sections. Halve each section lengthwise.
Grill the bread slices until toasted, turning once. Arrange on a platter cut-side up. Peel 2 garlic cloves and slightly crush with a knife. Rub the garlic cloves over the bread.

Ramped Up Crostini with Ricotta and Pea Shoots

~ Crostini with Ramps, Pea Shoots, Ricotta, Mint and Lemon ~

Spring is the time of new beginnings when fresh shoots and early leaves offer a taste of the season to come. Like a teen, these less mature greens are a contrast of nice and naughty – tender yet sharp in flavors that will develop and smooth with maturity. In this simple recipe, chopped ramps add bite and attitude to fluffy ricotta which is smeared over crostini and topped with a jumble of sweet, tender pea shoots.  Little else is needed except a pinch of fresh mint and a squeeze of lemon to shout spring and make these crostini pop.

Note: This recipe is a finalist this week in Food52′s recipe contest for “your best allum.”  Head over to Food52 and check out the contest and all of the other delicious goodies on their site, which just received an award from the James Beard Foundation for Publication of the Year!

Crostini with Ramps and Shoots

Ramps are wild leeks and resemble a scallion. Their long, broad green leaves and burgundy tinged bulb are edible. Green garlic is young garlic and also resembles a scallion. Green garlic may be substituted for the ramps.

Makes 8

8 one-inch thick baguette slices, sliced on the diagonal
Extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 cup whole milk ricotta
Sea salt
Freshly ground black pepper
1/4 cup finely chopped ramps or green garlic, bulbs and stems only
1 tablespoon finely chopped mint
1/2 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest
Generous handful pea shoots
1/2 lemon

Preheat oven to 400 F. Lightly brush bagette slices with olive oil. Arrange on baking sheet. Bake in oven until golden brown on both sides, turning once, 12 to 15 minutes. Remove.
Mix ricotta, 1 tablespoon oil, 1/2 teaspoon salt and black pepper in a bowl until fluffy. Stir in ramps, mint and lemon zest. Spread ricotta on baguette slices.
Top crostini with a large pinch of pea shoots. Drizzle a little olive oil over crostini, followed by a squeeze of lemon juice. Sprinkle with a few grains of sea salt and black pepper.

Roasted Fig Crostini

Fig tf

Oh, how I want to love figs. I am attracted to their shape and color, perfectly plump little bulbs, striated in violets and yellows, or hued in light green and dark purple. Soft and sensual to the touch and mildly aromatic, perhaps it’s their mildness that confounds me. Faintly sweet, yet nutty and vegetal, I find the fig elusive in flavor, its softness shrouding it like a mysterious woman in a cloak. I know there is more to the fig, and I want to discover it. I want to love it.

So, I found a ploy, or really a method, to reveal its secrets. By roasting figs in the oven, their taste and texture take on a whole new dimension. The fruit is coaxed from its shroud of vagueness, its natural sugars oozing and caramelizing, while its plumpness is reduced to a crispy intensity that bursts with flavor. There is no coyness or ambiguity with a roasted fig. It’s sweetness and articulated flavor is a perfect match with other ingredients, such as goat cheese and basil. Try it, you’ll like it. In fact, you will love it.

Roasted Fig Crostini

Makes 8

Extra-virgin olive oil
4 figs, sliced lengthwise, 1/4″ thick
8 slices of baguette, cut on the diagonal, 1/2″ thick
6 ounces soft mild goat cheese
Runny honey
Sea salt
Freshly ground black pepper
8 whole basil leaves

Preheat oven to 400 F. (200 C.)
Lightly oil baking tray. Arrange fig slices in one layer. Lightly brush tops with olive oil. Bake in oven until bubbly and beginning to caramelize, about 20 minutes. While figs are roasting, brush baguette slices with olive oil. Arrange on another baking tray in one layer. Bake in same oven until golden brown, about 10 minutes. To assemble crostini, spread baguette slices with goat cheese. Arrange 1-2 figs over cheese in one layer. Lightly drizzle with honey. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Top with a basil leaf. Serve immediately.

If you like this, you might enjoy these recipes from TasteFood:

Asparagus with Crispy Prosciutto and Tarragon Aioli
Prosciutto Fig Arugula Roll-Ups with Honey
Figs and Greens with Blue Cheese, Walnuts and Honey Vinaigrette

and these fig recipes from the foodblogs:
Fresh Fig Sorbet from Ms. Adventures in Italy
Fig Brie Grape Pizza from White on Rice Couple
Skinny Figgy Bars from Fat-Free Vegan Kitchen
Fig Cookies
from Andrea Meyers

Roasted Asparagus Crostini with Pecorino Cheese and Truffle Oil


Asparagus Crostini x

Recently I wrote about how much I like rustic desserts. Let me clarify that. I like rustic food. What is rustic food? It’s simple, local, seasonal food that makes use of available ingredients. Rustic cooking is a reflection of the countryside. It’s comforting and inviting, and it’s economical.


While crostini may conjure up images of dinner parties, cocktails and hors d’oeuvres, they are quite grounded in rustic cooking. Bread that is no longer fresh, is lightly toasted and flavored with olive oil and garlic. The toppings can run the gamut, but are usually fresh, simple and composed with ingredients on hand.

Roasted Asparagus Crostini with Pecorino Cheese and Truffle Oil were created as an impromptu starter for a barbecue this weekend. Day old baguette was efficiently put to use, while the asparagus were fresh from the morning’s farmers market. Pecorino Toscano and a little truffle oil were fished from the refrigerator and were the necessary finishing touches for this rustic and delicious appetizer.

Asparagus Crostini tf

Roasted Asparagus Crostini with Pecorino Cheese and Truffle Oil

Makes 16

16 baguette slices, cut 1/4″ thick
2 garlic cloves, lightly smashed
Extra-virgin olive oil

8 asparagus spears, bottoms trimmed
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon truffle oil
1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/4 cup shaved mild Pecorino cheese (Pecorino Toscano)

Prepare crostini:

Preheat oven to 400 F. (200 C). Rub baguette slices with garlic. Lightly brush with olive oil. Arrange on baking sheet and bake until golden brown. Remove and cool.

Prepare asparagus:

Toss asparagus with 1 tablespoon olive oil. Arrange in one layer on baking sheet. Roast under oven broiler until bright green and slightly charred but still firm, 3-4 minutes. Remove. When cool enough to handle cut horizontally in thin slices. If stalks are thick, slice in half lengthwise and cut halves in thin slices. Transfer to a bowl and toss asparagus with truffle oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper. Top crostini with asparagus. Top asparagus with pecorino cheese. Serve.

If you like this recipe, you might enjoy these recipes from TasteFood:

Crostini with Ramps and Pea Shoots
Crostini with Honey Roasted Figs, Mozzarella and Prosciutto Crisps
Bruschetta with Mixed Spring Greens, Lemon and Ricotta Salata

or these delicious crostini recipes from the food blogs:

Crostini with Spanish Green Olive Tapenade from Herbivoracious
Caramelized Onion Crostini from For the Love of Cooking
Egg Radish Crostini from The Dinner Files

More Ramps: Crostini with Sautéed Ramps

Ramps tf

More ramps? Yes, please. Ramp season is fleeting, so now is the time to take advantage of these baby leeks by the bunch.  Tiny and fragile they may be, but do not underestimate these delicate onions – they pack a punch in the flavor department. Their unique flavor is a cross between a green onion and garlic. Eaten raw, ramps are sharp and pungent, making a distinct impression in salads, pestos, gremolatas or simply as a garnish. Cooking ramps will result in a kinder gentler version of themselves, coaxing out their natural sweetness and softening their shape into slippery ribbons with the added character of a little char.

Crostini with Sautéed Ramps is one of my favorite ways to showcase seasonal food: minimally, with few adorning ingredients thus allowing the flavors of the key ingredient to shine through. In this case, baguette slices are browned in olive oil in a skillet. Ramps are added to the same skillet and sautéed until tender and golden brown, then heaped over mild and creamy buffalo mozzarella. A chiffonade of ramp leaves serves as an efficient garnish along with a simple pinch of sea salt. What you see is what you get: One skillet and 3 ingredients create a sweet and savory, creamy and crunchy mouthful that will send you to the market for more ramps. Hurry, though, the season is short.
Crostini with Sautéed Ramps

Makes 8

Extra-virgin olive oil
8 – 1/2″ thick slices baguette
8 ramps, ends trimmed, leaves trimmed and reserved
sea salt
1 ball buffalo mozzarella (approx. 8 ounces) room temperature, cut in half, each half cut in 4 slices

Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil in a skillet over medium heat. Arrange baguette slices in one layer. Cook until golden brown on both sides; remove. Add 1 tablespoon olive oil to skillet. Add ramps; sprinkle with 1 teaspoon salt. Sauté until golden brown and soft. Remove from heat. Slice ramps in half lengthwise.
Take 4 reserved ramp leaves and stack on top of one another. Roll up lengthwise. Cut horizontally in thin strips. Arrange crostini on a serving plate. Place a mozzarella slice on crostini. Top with ramps. Garnish with ramp leaf chiffonade. Sprinkle with a little sea salt.

 

 

 

Crostini with Ramps and Pea Shoots

Ramp Crostini

This simple recipe highlights the fresh flavors and ingredients of spring. Chopped ramps add crunch, bite and attitude to fluffy ricotta which is smeared over crostini and topped with a jumble of sweet pea shoots.  Little else is needed except a pinch of fresh mint and a squeeze of lemon to keep things real and make these crostini sing.

Crostini with Ramps and Shoots

Ramps, also known as wild leeks, are a member of the onion family and resemble a scallion. Their long, broad green leaves and burgundy tinged bulb are edible. Green Garlic also resembles a scallion and is garlic in its early growth stages. Green garlic may be substituted for the ramps.

Makes 8

8 – 1/2″ thick baguette slices
extra-virgin olive oil

1/2 cup whole milk ricotta
sea salt
freshly ground black pepper
1/4 cup finely chopped ramps or green garlic, bulbs and stems only
1 tablespoon finely chopped mint
generous handful pea shoots
1/2 lemon

Preheat oven to 400 F. Lightly brush bagette slices with olive oil. Arrange on baking sheet. Bake in oven until golden brown on both sides, turning once. Remove.
Mix ricotta, 1 tablespoon oil, 1/2 teaspoon salt and black pepper in a bowl until fluffy. Stir in ramps and mint. Spread ricotta on baguette slices.
Top crostini with a few pea shoots. Drizzle a little olive oil over crostini, followed by a squeeze of lemon juice. Sprinkle with a few grains of sea salt and black pepper.