Grilled Fish and Vegetable Skewers with Barramundi

Grilled Fish Skewers TasteFood

~ Grilled Fish and Vegetable Skewers with Barramundi ~

Weekends are made for grilling, and this weekend was no different. On the menu were these fish skewers with chunks of barramundi, sweet peppers and red onion. I’ve been having some fun with barramundi lately, generously provided by the folks at Australis who are raising barramundi in some of the world’s most innovative fish farms located in Massachusetts and Vietnam. Australis is considered to be a pioneer in the use of close-containment farming (systems that are considered the “gold standard” for sustainable aquaculture). Their greener way of farming has been recognized by leading environmental organizations, including Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch Program, Environmental Defense, and Blue Institute, while their Smart Aquaculture practices have earned Australis the prestigious “Seafood Champion Award” by Seafood Choices Alliance. It’s no wonder they refer to their product as The Better Fish.

I enjoy the mild and buttery flavor of barramundi, and now I can attest to how well it holds up on the grill.  I used my favorite go-to marinade to coat the chunks of fish. Its secret ingredient is grated onion which adds a sweet and tangy depth of flavor that enhances the barramundi without overpowering its mild flavor.

Grilled Fish Skewers TasteFood

Grilled Fish and Veggie Skewers with Barramundi
This marinade works well with most firm-fleshed fish, including swordfish, halibut or salmon. Serves 4 to 5.

Marinade:
1/4 cup grated yellow onion, grated, with juices
1/4 cup soy sauce or tamari
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

2 pounds barramundi, cut in 1 1/2″ chunks
1 red onion, cut in 1-inch chunks
1 large sweet red or yellow bell pepper, cut in 1-inch chunks

8 bamboo skewers, soaked in water for at least 30 minutes or metal skewers.

Whisk the marinade ingredients in a large bowl. Add fish and gently turn to coat. Cover and refrigerate 1 hour.
Prepare grill for direct cooking over medium-high heat (or preheat oven broiler.) Thread fish on skewers, alternating onion and peppers. Grill over direct medium-high heat, turning, until fish is charred and just cooked through, about 8 minutes. Arrange on a platter and garnish with parsley sprigs.

Australis’ barramundi is currently available in Northern California Costco stores. If you live elsewhere, check out the Australis Facebook page for your nearest retailer, updates and news on Australis Barramundi.

australis barramundi

Disclaimer: Australis provided me with a free sample of Barramundi for review purposes, and I am being compensated for this post via the NoshOnIt Partner Publisher Program. My opinions are entirely my own.

Roasted Barramundi and Baby Leeks with Mustard and Dill

barramundi tastefood

~ Oven Roasted Barramundi and Baby Leeks with Mustard  and Dill ~

We eat a lot of fish here at TasteFood. It’s a healthy and delicious source of protein, and with so many types of fish available, there is always one that will please even the pickiest of eaters. The challenge is balancing our appetite for seafood with the knowledge of how the fish is sourced and whether it’s sustainable, as many species are overfished and face precipitous declines. So, when I was contacted by Australis Aquaculture and NoshOnIt to sample and review a sustainably raised fish called Barramundi that is currently available in select Northern California Costco stores, I was very interested.

Australis Aquaculture is an award-winning provider of healthy, sustainable seafood. It’s sustainable practices have been recognized by all of the major NGOs and earned the company the coveted “Seafood Champion Award”. (You might understand why I am happy to get behind that.) Australis has spearheaded the introduction of barramundi as a growing culinary trend in North America. Barramundi’s mild, buttery flavor and moist meaty texture (think snapper crossed with striped bass or halibut) is earning high marks for its health benefits and eco-friendly profile. The fish is sold fresh to a growing number of chefs and well known restaurants across the country, including Eric Ripert’s Le Bernardin and Thomas Keller’s French Laundry. While I haven’t had the opportunity to experience barramundi at these restaurants (darn it), I have enjoyed it elsewhere in San Francisco restaurants.

I was more than pleased to have the opportunity to prepare barramundi for a family dinner this week. Baby leeks were in the market, and I combined the fish and leeks in a simple lemony dijon-dill marinade spiked with a splash of sriracha. The fish was indeed light yet meaty with a slightly sweet and buttery flavor which stood up well to the onions and fragrant marinade. Best of all, our picky eater gave it a thumbs up. The good news is that you too can experience this flavorful and sustainable fish. To find your nearest retailer check out the Australis Facebook page for updates and news on when and where you can find Australis Barramundi. I think you’ll like it.

australis barramundi

Oven Roasted Barramundi and Baby Leeks with Mustard and Dill
Serves 4

Marinade:
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill, plus extra sprigs for garnish
1 to 2 teaspoons Sriracha or hot sauce, to taste
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

2 pounds barramundi filets
1/2 pound baby leeks or thick green onions

Whisk sauce ingredients in a wide shallow bowl. Add the barramundi filets and turn to coat. Cover and refrigerate for 30 minutes.

Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C). Remove the filets from the marinade and place  in one layer in a large baking dish. Add leeks to the marinade and turn to coat. Arrange the leeks around the filets. Bake until fish is cooked through, about 25 minutes. Serve garnished with dill sprigs.

Disclaimer: Australis provided me with a free sample of Barramundi for review purposes, and I am being compensated for this post via the NoshOnIt Partner Publisher Program. My opinions are entirely my own.